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California to Legislate Stronger Children’s Online Safety Bill

  • Richard Marley
  • September 02, 2022
  • 2 minutes read
  • 100
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Assembly Bill 2273 for children’s online safety and privacy was approved by lawmakers in California. According to the bill, those breaking the law will pay a penalty for using children’s data.  

Following the UK legislators, California lawmakers approved the bill for children’s online safety. It required online businesses to consider the usage of the internet by children and how it adds to the rules of data privacy.  

The California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act requires different platforms to make certain restrictions for children, under the age of 18. These platforms include YouTube, TikTok and Instagram, along with various other businesses offering online services and content that children can access. According to this act, businesses will be required to implement settings of higher privacy for minors. 

The bill awaits the signature of Gov. Gavin Newsom. Children go through online content without considering what they will see or get deluged in an endless flow of products that search for revenue. Either way, lawmakers want children to consume online content in a protective context. 

Moreover, it’s said that when necessary, businesses will have to provide children with an option about informed decisions for what they do next. The bill will apply to every business or content provider whose service can be accessed by children online.

According to the children’s advocacy organization,  the law tells about the need to ensure children’s online safety and health a greater priority for lawmakers. Moreover, they said that businesses should be very keen when it comes to websites that children or young users can access easily. 

Where the information of a child is collected, the law would secure it from being illegitimately used for another purpose. Civil penalties that fall under the Act can reach $7,500 per affected child.

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